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Pregnancy and Smoking


Protecting your baby from tobacco smoke is one of the best things you can do to give your child a healthy start in life. It can be difficult to stop smoking, but it's never too late to quit. 

Every cigarette you smoke contains over 4,000 chemicals, so smoking when you are pregnant harms your unborn baby. Cigarettes can restrict the essential oxygen supply to your baby. As a result, their heart has to beat harder every time you smoke.

Benefits of stopping smoking in pregnancy

Stopping smoking will help both you and your baby immediately. Harmful gases, such as carbon monoxide, and other damaging chemicals will clear from your body. When you stop smoking: 

  • you will reduce the risk of complications in pregnancy and birth 
  • you are more likely to have a healthier pregnancy and a healthier baby 
  • you will reduce the risk of stillbirth
  • your baby is less likely to be born too early and have to face the additional breathing, feeding and health problems that often go with being premature
  • your baby is less likely to be born underweight: babies of women who smoke are, on average, 200g (about 8oz) lighter than other babies, which can cause problems during and after labour. For example they are more likely to have a problem keeping warm and are more prone to infection 
  • you will reduce the risk of cot death, also known as sudden infant death syndrome

Stopping smoking now will also help your baby later in life. Children whose parents smoke are more likely to suffer from asthma and other serious illnesses that may need hospital treatment. 

The sooner you stop smoking, the better. But even if you stop in the last few weeks of your pregnancy this will benefit you and your baby.
 

Impact of smoking and exposure to secondhand
smoke in pregnancy

  Maternal smoking Secondhand smoke exposure
Low birth weight Average 250g lighter Average 30-40g lighter
Stillbirth Double the likelihood Increase risk
Miscarriage 24%-32% more likely Possible increase
Preterm birth 27% more likely Increase risk
Heart defects 50% more likely Increase risk
Sudden Infant Death 3 times more likely 45% more likely

Source: Passive Smoking and Children, Royal College of Physicians and Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, 2010

 

Secondhand (passive) smoke harms your baby

If your partner or anyone else who lives with you smokes, their smoke can affect you and the baby both before and after birth. You may also find it more difficult to stop if someone around you smokes.

Secondhand smoke can also reduce the baby's birthweight and increase the risk of cot death. Babies whose parents smoke are more likely to be admitted to hospital for bronchitis and pneumonia during their first year.  

Stop today

If you think you could benefit from some support to stop smoking complete our short online assessment.

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If you would like to talk to someone about this service and its benefits to you, please contact us on 01392 908 139 or use our online chat (bottom right) to talk to one of our friendly team.

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Quitting smoking can have a positive effect on your health and you in many different ways. You will reduce your risk of developing illness, disability or death caused by cancer, heart or lung disease

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Stop Smoking
Pregnancy and Smoking

Protecting your baby from tobacco smoke is one of the best things you can do to give your child a healthy start in life.

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